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Pig Kidney Transplanted into Brain-Dead Man Survives for Two Months: Groundbreaking Study Explores Organ Compatibility

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A Pig Kidney Successfully Transplanted into a Brain-Dead Man

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Introduction

A groundbreaking medical procedure has achieved the longest survival period of a non-human organ in a human body. A pig kidney transplanted into a brain-dead man remained functional for a remarkable two months.

The Transplant Operation

The operation took place on July 14 and involved a kidney transplant for Maurice Moe Miller, a 58-year-old man whose family generously donated his body after his death was confirmed. Even though Miller was brain-dead, his heart was still beating with the help of a ventilator.

Successful Experiment Conclusion

The experiment concluded on Wednesday when doctors removed the genetically modified pig kidney. Mary Miller, Maurice’s sister, tearfully expressed her pride in a heartfelt moment by her brother’s bedside.

Promising Findings

The surgeons at NYU Langone Health, who conducted the study, discovered no significant differences in the interaction between pig kidneys and human hormones. They also observed no issues with the secretion of antibiotics or drug-related side effects.

Reviving Hope for Organ Transplantation

This procedure represents a significant step forward in the field of organ transplantation. It is part of a series of developments that offer renewed hope for the successful transplantation of animal organs into humans.

Previous Attempt and Cautionary Note

In a previous attempt, a transplanted organ was rejected after just 72 hours. However, Karen Maschke from the Hastings Center, an organization that helps establish ethical and policy guidelines for organ transplant trials, warns that experiments on deceased individuals may not accurately predict organ behavior in living subjects.

The Experimental Process

The experiment began on July 14 when doctors Adam Griesemer and Jeffrey Stern traveled to a Revivicor facility in Virginia. This facility houses genetically modified pigs with kidney-regenerating capabilities. These pigs lack a specific gene that would trigger an immediate immune system response in humans. The team then transported the pig kidney to New York, where Dr. Robert Montgomery, the lead transplant surgeon, successfully removed one of Miller’s kidneys. The other kidney will serve as a comparison in the upcoming analysis of the study’s results.

Source

Information sourced from the Daily Mail.

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